Low-carb diets may improve high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and triglyceride values slightly more than do moderate-carb diets. That may be due not only to how many carbs you eat but also to the quality of your other food choices. Lean protein (fish, poultry, legumes), healthy fats (monounsaturated and polyunsaturated) and unprocessed carbs — such as whole grains, legumes, vegetables, fruits and low-fat dairy products — are generally healthier choices.
When made as per instructions and sliced 1cm thick, the bread yields 20 slices. As we use high quality (mostly Australian) natural ingredients, the cost is higher than normal bread (and a lot more nutritionally dense too). It has similar nutritional makeup to a protein bar (which are usually around $5 each) so quite good value for a high protein low carb snack or meal!
Not everyone should opt for a low-carb diet. If you’re pregnant, it’s possible to be on a lower-carb diet (and may even be indicated if you are told you have gestational diabetes), but talk to your doctor to find out what’s right for you and to ensure that you’re covering any potential nutrient gaps. “Many women who are pregnant find that the thought of eating protein and fat makes them sick,” says Spritzler. This can be especially common in the first trimester. “They naturally want more carbs. You should always listen to your body,” she says.

Whether you're cutting back on carbs for a specific diet (such as Keto, Paleo or Atkins), or you're a diabetic trying to manage your blood sugar levels, one of the hardest things to give up when you're on a low-carb diet is bread. It's comfort food at its finest. But the good news is there are more and more low-carb bread options in grocery stores and recipes that rely on wholesome ingredients and deliver on taste.


Low-carb diets may improve high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and triglyceride values slightly more than do moderate-carb diets. That may be due not only to how many carbs you eat but also to the quality of your other food choices. Lean protein (fish, poultry, legumes), healthy fats (monounsaturated and polyunsaturated) and unprocessed carbs — such as whole grains, legumes, vegetables, fruits and low-fat dairy products — are generally healthier choices.
Healthy fats & oils are back in too: Eating fat does not automatically clog the blood vessels in the way that poring oil down the drain will eventually block the drain. You make your own cholesterol and lipids and are more likely to increase your levels of the more damaging Very Low Density Lipoprotein (VLD), which is made in the liver when you eat a high carbohydrate diet.
Phase 1: Induction. In this strict phase, you cut out almost all carbohydrates from your diet, eating just 20 grams of net carbs a day, mainly from vegetables. Instead of getting 45 to 65 percent of your daily calories from carbohydrates, as recommended by most nutrition guidelines, you get only about 10 percent. "Foundation" vegetables, such as asparagus, broccoli, celery, cucumber, green beans and peppers, should account for 12 to 15 grams of your daily net carbs. 

When made as per instructions and sliced 1cm thick, the bread yields 20 slices. As we use high quality (mostly Australian) natural ingredients, the cost is higher than normal bread (and a lot more nutritionally dense too). It has similar nutritional makeup to a protein bar (which are usually around $5 each) so quite good value for a high protein low carb snack or meal!

Unlike "low-calorie" or "reduced-fat" claims, the FDA has not legally defined what "low-carbohydrate" means. Therefore, for the purposes of this list all of the options below have no more than 14 grams of total carbs and no more than 9 grams of net carbs. "Net carbs are the carbohydrates that your body can digest. Our bodies can't fully digest fiber, which is a type of carbohydrate. So net carbs is referring to the total number of carbohydrates in a food after the fiber has been subtracted out," explains Phipps. Sugar alcohols are subtracted as well when calculating net carbs.

If you treat your diabetes with insulin or any other medication that puts you at risk of hypos (low blood sugar levels), following a low-carb diet may increase this risk. Speak to your healthcare team about this so they can help you adjust your medications to reduce your risk of hypos. Your team may also support you to check your blood sugar levels more often.  
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