Mai Funaki. Thank you for your comment. You do touch on some interesting points concerning low carb, overweight, obesity and diabetes. It has certainly been suggested that carbohydrate restriction may be beneficial in type 2 diabetes. Here is an interesting overview that you might want to read: https://www.nutritionandmetabolism.com/content/5/1/9. I do agree with you about physical activity. I think it is an essential part of a healthy lifestyle and a key to physical and psychological wellbeing. The japanese experience is certainly interesting and proves that carbohydrates don´t necessarily make you fat. This may all depend on the type and amount of… Read more »


Hi GF, The amount of protein you get to consume depends on what you are eating. For example, chicken breast is 9 grams of protein per ounce and ribeye steak is 7 grams of protein per ounce. So if you ate only chicken breast 3 times a day, that would mean roughly 2.6 ounces of chicken breast per meal. I hope this helps! Feel free to send any additional questions you have!
Ada – You want to count all your carbs. In the beginning, before you get to really know what you can and can’t have, yes. You’ll be counting everything. But you’ll get the hang of it pretty quickly. Carbs are carbs no matter where they come from. So just keep track of your total carbs for the day and try to ensure that the majority of them come from low carb veggies. In my 101 section, you’ll find lists of the lowest carb fruits and veggies. Hope that helps!

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I have been on the Keto diet for 3 months, it was slow at first, but I have lost a lot of inches and a total of 12 pounds. I used your calculator, and I try hard to stay within the net carbs, but I have been taking in less calories than the 1880 that was recommended. If I take in fewer calories, do you usually tend to see a quicker decline in weight loss?
Thank you for writing this post, it’s very helpful! I started low carbing a while back (probably more than a year ago) and ended up backsliding, as can often happen when trying to drastically change your eating habits. On Friday I had my annual physical and my doctor ordered blood work for glucose and insulin because previous results indicate I’m insulin resistant. The results from Friday indicate I still am, so now I’m a little worried and going back to low carb. One phone app (and website) I’ve found to be really helpful is Fat Secret. You can choose exactly which macro nutrients you want to see and it also shows percent of fat, carbs, and protein in a pie chart that I find helps me wrap my head around what I’ve consumed. It also helps that the app and website don’t seem to promote one eating plan over another.
Hi Sandy, I’m not a doctor so cannot give medical advice, but do have years of research and experience in this lifestyle. Kidney failure can happen due to excessive protein intake, which was more prevalent on older versions of the Atkins diet. This is a common misconception with low carb and keto diets – that they have to mean high protein – and they shouldn’t be. If you keep your protein in check, it shouldn’t be an issue. But, I would definitely consult with your doctor since you have had issues with this.
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