Fat loss is dependent on how many grams in fat macros are being consumed. The body doesn’t just lose fat. It taps into those fat reserves to burn it as fuel, ketones. Yes, you can achieve & maintain ketosis with a high fat diet, as long as it is also low carb. Because low carb is the only requirement to be ketogenic. But high fat is not necessary for weight loss. If the body follows a high fat diet, then it will prioritize the newly consumed fat before it turns to that stored body fat.
Focus on fresh low-carb foods: Even if you don’t eat sugary and starchy foods, you may still be consuming ingredients that can cause skin issues. Bologna and other processed meats often contain sugar, corn syrup, fillers or other additives that raise insulin levels and potentially provoke inflammation. Stick to fresh food whenever possible, and read labels on processed meats and other packaged foods.

The benefits of LCHF diets in sports are mainly seen in long-distance running and other endurance events. The body’s fat stores are huge and dwarf the minuscule glycogen stores. This means that once an athlete has transitioned to burning fat instead of carbohydrates, he or she will be able to perform for long periods of time without needing much (if any) additional food for energy.
Let's start with some background. The ketogenic diet was created in the 1920s to treat children with seizure disorders for whom medication was no longer working. Research had shown that being in the state of ketosis—meaning the body is using fat for fuel instead of its natural and preferred source, glucose—reduced the frequency of seizures. The fat-burning benefit obviously gave this diet its now mass appeal.

Under normal circumstances our body uses glucose from carbohydrate foods for energy. In the absence of glucose a process called ketosis occurs. This is a state in which the body burns fats instead of carbohydrates as its main fuel source. When we don’t eat carbs, the liver breaks down fat stores to produce energy. This energy is in the form of (and also creates) molecules called ‘ketones’. 
As for me, I'm thankfully allowed to eat the full spectrum of fruits, vegetables and whole grains again. Going on the ketogenic diet made me realise I still held onto the belief that fats are the enemy. But good fats are vital for optimal health, so I'll be keeping the olive oil dressings and lashings of avocado in my diet, while definitely eating less bacon.
At the end of the day, “you want to create a diet for yourself that feels comfortable for you to commit to for the long-term, so you don't gain and lose, gain and lose—called weight cycling—and feel like you are constantly dieting.” The first can invite health problems (like insulin resistance); the latter is, well, not fun (or all that healthy, mentally speaking).
The problem is that when your body is used to burning primarily carbohydrates – as is the case with most people are today – your fat stores are not easily available, and they can’t fuel your brain. This results in your constantly having to fill up by eating before, during and after longer exercise sessions. Or even just to fuel your daily activities and avoid “hanger”.
Definitely! To successfully maintain weight loss from either (or any) diet, Zeitlin advises focusing on doubling your veggies, eating lean proteins (fish, eggs, chicken, turkey, shellfish, lentils, tofu), healthy fats (nuts, seeds, avocado, olive oil), fresh fruit, and whole grains. “That is what is going to help the weight come off and stay off,” she says.
Diabetics, especially, type 1 diabetics are at risk of complications if they attempt to follow a ketogenic diet. For this reason diabetics and anyone with a blood sugar management issue should discuss the potential implications with their GP and healthcare team before embarking on such a regime. Similarly anyone with kidney disease or a family history of such should consult their GP. 
Mai Funaki. Thank you for your comment. You do touch on some interesting points concerning low carb, overweight, obesity and diabetes. It has certainly been suggested that carbohydrate restriction may be beneficial in type 2 diabetes. Here is an interesting overview that you might want to read: https://www.nutritionandmetabolism.com/content/5/1/9. I do agree with you about physical activity. I think it is an essential part of a healthy lifestyle and a key to physical and psychological wellbeing. The japanese experience is certainly interesting and proves that carbohydrates don´t necessarily make you fat. This may all depend on the type and amount of… Read more »

Hi Sandy, I’m not a doctor so cannot give medical advice, but do have years of research and experience in this lifestyle. Kidney failure can happen due to excessive protein intake, which was more prevalent on older versions of the Atkins diet. This is a common misconception with low carb and keto diets – that they have to mean high protein – and they shouldn’t be. If you keep your protein in check, it shouldn’t be an issue. But, I would definitely consult with your doctor since you have had issues with this.

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