A low-fat diet may be preferable for some individuals while other individuals may do better on a low carbohydrate diet. The fact that I may recommend a Paleo or an Atkins type diet for some people, does not mean that I am against whole grain or potatoes. Although  I recommend everybody to avoid simple refined sugars and junk food, I think complex carbohydrates, starches, and not least fiber can be a part of a healthy diet for many people.
I have nothing against low-fat diets. However, I doubt that the emphasis on low-fat, low saturated fat, in particular, is based on good scientific evidence. Furthermore, I believe that the overemphasis on low-fat may have caused consumers and manufacturers to choose foods that may be potentially harmful and could have contributed to the so-called obesity epidemic and increased prevalence of type 2 diabetes.

The main three macros that should be taken into consideration for a healthy body weight or fat loss are Carbohydrates, Proteins and fats. The amount of carbs, protein, fats are the basic macronutrients you should be careful about while keeping in account your body weight. For choosing the best macros, Keto diet is preferred by many individuals who have set on a low carb diet. The three major macros
This plan has more fat and less protein than the pure carnivore plan, and likely less meat: even fatty meat isn’t all that fatty by keto standards (for example, a nice juicy grilled T-bone is a whopping 38% protein, although you can lower that percentage rapidly by adding butter on top). With keto, you don’t necessarily eat a whole pile of T-bones; it’s more like half a T-bone with a lot of butter and some avocado and spinach salad.
Low carb eating is a broad term that can be applied to many different approaches and eating plans. It can be based on just about any number of carbs that are less than what you would typically eat. Every low carb diet out there from South Beach to Atkins will give you a different number of carbs to shoot for. So if you want to eat low carb, but are not interested in a Keto diet, you will need to do your research on the many, many low carb diets available on the market today.
Hi GF, The amount of protein you get to consume depends on what you are eating. For example, chicken breast is 9 grams of protein per ounce and ribeye steak is 7 grams of protein per ounce. So if you ate only chicken breast 3 times a day, that would mean roughly 2.6 ounces of chicken breast per meal. I hope this helps! Feel free to send any additional questions you have!

Maintain a moderate protein intake. A keto diet is not meant to be a very-high-protein diet. We recommend 1.2 to 1.7 grams of protein per kg of reference body weight per day. This means about 100 grams of protein per day if your lean body mass weight is around 70 kilos (155 pounds). Check out our target protein ranges to find out how much protein you should be aiming for each day.
This type of macro scheme works well for people who want to avoid dense starchy sources of carbs (potatoes, rice, bananas) to keep their blood sugar under control, but who  still eat more fresh vegetables than they can fit into a traditional keto plan. If you’re not aiming for keto specifically, you also have way more flexibility with protein – ramping up the protein content can help prevent hunger, and maintain muscle mass during weight loss.
Low carb wasn’t designed to put people into nutritional ketosis (although many of you might actually be in ketosis when you’re eating a low carb diet).  Low carb was mainly designed to restrict your carb intake.  Keto, on the other hand, is designed to put you into nutritional ketosis.  And it just happens that in order to get into nutritional ketosis, you decrease your carb intake and increase your fat intake.
Two weeks of adaptation to burning fat – it does not happen instantly. The second cause of reduced early performance is not as quickly fixed. It simply takes time for the body to transition from being a sugar-burner to burning primarily fat for energy, even in the muscles. This may take takes weeks or a even a few months. The more you exercise while on a low-carb, high-fat diet, the quicker this will happen. The end result has many benefits (see below).
When you’re following a traditional ketogenic diet, you consume around 75 percent of your daily calories from healthy fats, 5 percent from carbohydrates and approximately 20 percent from protein. In general, ketogenic diets typically limit daily net carb intake to just 20–30 grams, which is calculated by subtracting the number of grams of fiber from the total number of carbs.
I now eat a lower carb, moderate protein and moderate fat diet. I even eat whole wheat pasta (only 1/3 cup when I do eat it), I eat Ezekiel bread (1 slice) and on occassion, I eat potatoes (white) and even rice. I just keep the amounts around 10 grams of carbs. My breakfast is about 4 grams of carbs (its a protein shake and I put avacado in it as well). Lunch is 4 oz. protein, steamed veggies and/or a salad, slice of my bread with 1/2 tbsp. grass fed butter, snacks are 1.5 oz. nuts (1 oz. macadamian and 1/2 oz. cashews). Dinner has carbs from green veggies. And that’s it. And I drink a protein shake once a day because I lift weights along with doing cardio. In that shake I put 1/2 tbsp. nut butter and mix the shake with water. Sometimes I’ll add 1 to 2 oz. banana (yes, I weigh all of my food). And guess what?? I lose as much weight per week as if I was doing keto. I truly believe that eating a minimal amount of carbs per day makes a huge impact with weight loss. You don’t have to go into full blown keto to lose weight.
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