I have nothing against low-fat diets. However, I doubt that the emphasis on low-fat, low saturated fat, in particular, is based on good scientific evidence. Furthermore, I believe that the overemphasis on low-fat may have caused consumers and manufacturers to choose foods that may be potentially harmful and could have contributed to the so-called obesity epidemic and increased prevalence of type 2 diabetes.
Let's start with some background. The ketogenic diet was created in the 1920s to treat children with seizure disorders for whom medication was no longer working. Research had shown that being in the state of ketosis—meaning the body is using fat for fuel instead of its natural and preferred source, glucose—reduced the frequency of seizures. The fat-burning benefit obviously gave this diet its now mass appeal.
Heart attack in April 2019, very little heart damage. Typical:- high cholesterol, high blood pressure, prescribed atorvastatin, 80mg (serious muscles aches and worrying chest pains) ACE and Beta Blockers. Aspirin and clopidogrel. HbA1c reading 43 in July, Started a low carb high fat diet and was doing intermittent fasting for minim 12hrs max 20hrs and my results are that I have lost 5kg in 4weeks. HbA1c 6weeks after starting was 39, waist reduction, blood pressure is lower, I’m Moving easier, got lots more energy, I’m more focused, no gym visits only walking the dog in the morning. If you’re fat, then you’ll be sick, not if, when.. Focus on the basics and keep it as simple as you can. Eat when your hungry, but try and fast for over 12hrs (use your sleeping to fast as much as possible) fasting increases your body’ ability to tune back into to burning fat. But DONT eat carbs until you’ve got your health back (weight is a poor measure of health) How you feel when your moving about is more important than a number. There’s lots of info on the public health collaboration website, also, you tube Aseem Malhotra, very interesting stuff.
When you’re following a traditional ketogenic diet, you consume around 75 percent of your daily calories from healthy fats, 5 percent from carbohydrates and approximately 20 percent from protein. In general, ketogenic diets typically limit daily net carb intake to just 20–30 grams, which is calculated by subtracting the number of grams of fiber from the total number of carbs.
As the year comes to an end and the holiday indulgences just keep on coming (d*mn you, office cookie parties!), you may already be considering a weight-loss plan to try out for the New Year. One that's been around for years and likely isn't going anywhere? Cutting carbs. And then there's keto, the über-popular, high-fat extension of that. But if you're considering slashing those delicious carbohydrates at all, you might be wondering: What exactly makes keto different from low-carb diets in general? And really, who would win in a low-carb vs. keto face-off?
I have been following a fairly strict Keto diet for the last 4 months. 20g total carbs and have lost 17 lbs and feels so much better. Unfortunately, the way of eating has also given me out of control digestion problems, gas, bloating and serious runs. I am going to back off the Keto and add a few more carbs and hope it helps my tummy and that I can still lose a bit more weight. Another 10 would be perfect.
If you think you might be interested in following a Ketogenic diet, I implore you to do your research. There are many concerns and issues that can arise based on your own, individual constitution. For those people who can benefit from this sort of eating plan, the benefits are endless. But there are things you need to watch for when following this sort of eating plan. So do your homework. This is not for everyone.
I am 56 years old. about 3 years ago My hubby and I lost quite a lot of weight on a low carb life style. Me 70 him 100. Then I had to have a hysterectomy and a year later I lost my 23 year job. Needless to say, depression and hormones took over and I gained everything back. Him too. We are back at the low carb eating. The problem, He has lost 45 pounds so far. Me, 10. It just doesn’t seem to be working for me this time. Do you think the addition of more fats will help that? I need something that will give me a boost or a completely different way. I just thought I would ask you. You seem pretty knowledgeable on the subject.
Mai Funaki. Thank you for your comment. You do touch on some interesting points concerning low carb, overweight, obesity and diabetes. It has certainly been suggested that carbohydrate restriction may be beneficial in type 2 diabetes. Here is an interesting overview that you might want to read: https://www.nutritionandmetabolism.com/content/5/1/9. I do agree with you about physical activity. I think it is an essential part of a healthy lifestyle and a key to physical and psychological wellbeing. The japanese experience is certainly interesting and proves that carbohydrates don´t necessarily make you fat. This may all depend on the type and amount of… Read more »

“Typically, a low-carb diet focuses on protein and non-starchy vegetables, and limits grains, fruits, breads, sweets, and starchy veggies like legumes, potatoes and peas,” Zeitlin explains. Protein and veggies are extremely helpful in aiding—and maintaining weight loss—she continues. Plus, a general low-carb diet can be more sustainable in the long run, since it requires way less macro counting (read: obsessing over hitting that 70/20/10 ratio).
Angel – Our bodies get used to doing the same thing all the time. Sometimes you have to keep it guessing. There are a lot of approaches to this. Some people to “carb up” days (where they eat a specific amount more in carbs), some people throw in a different exercise, some people do an egg fast or even do a zero carb day or two. Depends on what you feel is right for you. Keto stalls are tough. But don’t give up.
“Typically, a low-carb diet focuses on protein and non-starchy vegetables, and limits grains, fruits, breads, sweets, and starchy veggies like legumes, potatoes and peas,” Zeitlin explains. Protein and veggies are extremely helpful in aiding—and maintaining weight loss—she continues. Plus, a general low-carb diet can be more sustainable in the long run, since it requires way less macro counting (read: obsessing over hitting that 70/20/10 ratio).
The most common side effect of the diet is constipation as a result of cutting out vital sources of fibre in the diet – fruits, vegetables, beans and grains. Lack of fibre can also increase the risk of bowel cancer and heart disease in the long term. I negated this by drinking lots of water, eating plenty of the high-fibre 'allowed' vegetables and taking a fibre supplement.
“The fact that I may recommend a Paleo or an Atkins type diet for some people, does not mean that I am against whole grain or potatoes. Although I recommend everybody to avoid simple refined sugars and junk food, I think complex carbohydrates, starches and not least fibre can be a part of a healthy diet for most people.” I admit I don’t understand the notion that “refined” carbs are bad but something like whole wheat isn’t lumped in with the refined carbs group. There isn’t much difference between white flour and whole grain flour – both elevate your blood… Read more »
“In other words, the science itself makes clear that hormones, enzymes, and growth factors regulate our fat tissue, just as they do everything else in the human body, and that we do not get fat because we overeat; we get fat because the carbohydrates in our diet make us fat. The science tells us that obesity is ultimately the result of a hormonal imbalance, not a caloric one—specifically, the stimulation of insulin secretion caused by eating easily digestible, carbohydrate-rich foods: refined carbohydrates, including flour and cereal grains, starchy vegetables such as potatoes, and sugars, like sucrose (table sugar) and high-fructose corn syrup. These carbohydrates literally make us fat, and by driving us to accumulate fat, they make us hungrier and they make us sedentary. This is the fundamental reality of why we fatten, and if we’re to get lean and stay lean we’ll have to understand and accept it, and, perhaps more important, our doctors are going to have to understand and acknowledge it, too.”
Thanks for the post Wendi. It’s interesting to read. In fact I don’t think this is an uncommon situation. Hopefully it is a question about time. Many doctors are very stuck with the “prudent” low fat diet. That’s what we learned in medical school and it’s generally accepted by the medical community. But we may have a different situation than 30 years ago. So many people are dealing with overweight issues and metabolic syndrome is becoming more and more common. There is abundant evidence suggesting that carbohydrate restriction is beneficial in these situations. It is likely that carbohydrate restriction will… Read more »
I have been following a very strict keto diet for 16 months- <20grC, 180g F, <40gr P. No cheating. At inception my HBAc1=4.8%. After 16 months: super strong Dawn effect no matter what I do. My FBG still always around 5-5.7 mmol/l, FBK have been lower and lower as time passes by usually 0.5-1mmol/l ( 9 months ago FBG was slightly higher 1.-2mmol/l). If one night I do not sleep well- like recently my FBG was 7.3mmol/l ! Neoglucogenesis! I have not gotten leaner- actually I am staying in status quo. I could get leaner I am a bit chubby. Whether I had insulin resistance prior I do not know, did not test, but possibly. Whether I have developed "physiological IR/glucose sparing" that could be. I feel really fine, but my FBG is still very very volatile with respect with other people's experience. The lack of fat reduction is also a symptom that is curious. As a child around age 9-11 I became spontaneously/accidentally ketotic for 2.5 years. I was actually not feeling well at all breath, dizziness, etc. had to test ketones- was loosing a lot of weight. The pediatrician called this "acetone" and required that I eat a diet with as low as possible fat and more carbs- after two years my body seemed to get back to usual diet. I remained under this impression all my life that I should not indulge in fat. I do not like that I do not understand what is happening and why my FBG is rather elevated in the morning, and always around 4.5 or lower in the evening. I have histamine issues and leaky gut, and obviously cortisol related issues, but would this explain it all?

Ketogenic diets were originally developed to treat epilepsy in children as it appears to reduce the frequency of seizures. It should be noted that using the diet in this context should not be attempted without the supervision of a specialised doctor. From these medical origins, the diet was picked up by the mainstream media and marketed as a weight loss regime – it is in this context that we will be discussing the diet for the purpose of this article.
Jan – It takes a while for your body to become “fat adapted”. Every person is different, but my guess is that your body is probably still adjusting. I’m not a medical professional so please don’t take this as medical advice in any way. But I also had this issue and it turned out that I was going a little heavy on the coconut fat, which can be a stomach irritant in large doses. It’s okay to back off a bit to give your body that adjustment time. Increasing fats slowly over time can make things a lot easier. I know it’s tempting to dive in head first, but your body is telling you something, so you should definitely pay attention. Google “Fat adapted” for more info. I don’t know a lot about this. All I can share is my personal experience. For me, it was too much fat too quick as well as the type of fat I was using. It may be something totally different for you, so you’ll need to experiment to see what’s causing it. Keep in mind that a Keto eating plan is a tremendous change to the body from a mainstream eating plan. 6 weeks is not a lot of time. But if it persists, it’s probably best to keep in contact with your doctor on a regular basis. Kudos to your doctor for being open to this way of eating!

Hi Sandy, I’m not a doctor so cannot give medical advice, but do have years of research and experience in this lifestyle. Kidney failure can happen due to excessive protein intake, which was more prevalent on older versions of the Atkins diet. This is a common misconception with low carb and keto diets – that they have to mean high protein – and they shouldn’t be. If you keep your protein in check, it shouldn’t be an issue. But, I would definitely consult with your doctor since you have had issues with this.

Angel – Our bodies get used to doing the same thing all the time. Sometimes you have to keep it guessing. There are a lot of approaches to this. Some people to “carb up” days (where they eat a specific amount more in carbs), some people throw in a different exercise, some people do an egg fast or even do a zero carb day or two. Depends on what you feel is right for you. Keto stalls are tough. But don’t give up.


Cut back on ultra-processed foods and drinks – healthy wholegrain carbs are not the enemy, but junk food certainly is, says Professor Collins. "In Australia, one third of our total daily kilojoule intake comes from 'discretionary choices'." Always being prepared with healthy snacks is a great way to stop you from going to the vending machine mid-afternoon.
I have been on a Keto diet now for 6 weeks and although I have lost about 6 lbs, I find I am constantly mildly nauseated. I talked to my doctor about it and he doesn’t know what to recommend. I have come to the conclusion that it is the amount of fat I eat, which is in keeping with the keto directions my doctor gave me. Granted being nauseated does keep my appetite in check, but it is not a fun feeling, especially since as a meal time rolls around, I know I need to eat, but nothing appeals to me. Any suggestions?

This is a very extreme approach and it’s worth noting that there’s almost no research on the long-term efficacy or safety of carnivore diets – and nothing on long-term consumption by overweight people in the 21st century looking to drop a few pants sizes. One of the best long-term accounts we have is the notes taken by Vilhjálmur Stefansson back in the early 1900s – his report on the Inuit diet is interesting and cool but not really a great scientific foundation by modern standards. There are a lot of unanswered questions here about nutritional deficiencies, especially if you’re not eating a lot of organ meats.
Hi GF, The amount of protein you get to consume depends on what you are eating. For example, chicken breast is 9 grams of protein per ounce and ribeye steak is 7 grams of protein per ounce. So if you ate only chicken breast 3 times a day, that would mean roughly 2.6 ounces of chicken breast per meal. I hope this helps! Feel free to send any additional questions you have!

Allow me to affirm the benefits of LCHF DIETS as described in the article, with some suggestion and additions to it. Fats do clog arteries by the means of increasing the blood plasma aggregability, in other words it doesn’t increase the viscosity of blood but obstructs its rate of entrance within capillary vessels. But this is OK. not a problem, if it is continued for a reasonable period. However it is a big damaging clogging element, if the blood vessels are not giving sometime to heal. On the otherhand excessive carbs intake will finally be converted to visceral stored fat, and again this is absolutely OK, as long as this doesn’t continue fo ever, brcause it will start clogging body organs, like the liver, the pancreas, and the heart. However, if at a certain juncture, excessive carbs intake is disrupted, and a person alternates between LCHF & LFHC diets, this should periodically takes full advantage of each diet, and still give ample time to heal from its disadvantages… think about that. Nature usually forced all living beings to alternate between different categories of food depending on each season. And as a matter of fact, this is what body builders do. It’s called cyclic carbing….

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