Mai Funaki. Thank you for your comment. You do touch on some interesting points concerning low carb, overweight, obesity and diabetes. It has certainly been suggested that carbohydrate restriction may be beneficial in type 2 diabetes. Here is an interesting overview that you might want to read: https://www.nutritionandmetabolism.com/content/5/1/9. I do agree with you about physical activity. I think it is an essential part of a healthy lifestyle and a key to physical and psychological wellbeing. The japanese experience is certainly interesting and proves that carbohydrates don´t necessarily make you fat. This may all depend on the type and amount of… Read more »
For instance, a 2007 controlled study in 43 young acne-prone men by Smith, et al, found that a low-glycemic-load diet led to a greater reduction in acne lesions than a higher-glycemic-load diet. What’s more, the low-glycemic-load group experienced a decrease in androgen and insulin levels, improvement in insulin sensitivity, and weight loss. By contrast, the other group had increases in weight, insulin levels, and insulin resistance.
Great Q. While the answer isn't totally black and white, Zeitlin says that for most healthy people, if you're trying to lose weight, a low-carb diet would be the better fit because it doesn't aim to put your body into an unnatural state (ahem, ketosis). Instead, by cutting back on foods that are high in sugar and starches, you're able to drop weight and still maintain a healthy form of energy for your brain and body to run on.
My husband and I are following keto. We started January 1st. We recommend being under doctors care if you have any medical issues. We both have heart disease, needed to lose weight and my husband was diabetic type 2. I suffered from kidney issues. Our journey has brought us to lose (husband) 41 pounds (me) 74 pounds. My husband is off all medications (he was taking 7) down to one, with blood work being normal. His heart doctor of course can’t wrap his mind around this diet and even though the blood work is normal he wants to still have him on 3 medicines for preventative purposes. He is no longer on any diabetes medicine and has more energy than ever before. With me the kidneys were a big issue so getting levels every three weeks was not fun, but with keto you must drink at least eight glasses of water. I drink 12 glasses of water a day. We will definitely stay on keto and watch macros. We use 5% carbs, 70% fat and 20% protein.

My husband and I are following keto. We started January 1st. We recommend being under doctors care if you have any medical issues. We both have heart disease, needed to lose weight and my husband was diabetic type 2. I suffered from kidney issues. Our journey has brought us to lose (husband) 41 pounds (me) 74 pounds. My husband is off all medications (he was taking 7) down to one, with blood work being normal. His heart doctor of course can’t wrap his mind around this diet and even though the blood work is normal he wants to still have him on 3 medicines for preventative purposes. He is no longer on any diabetes medicine and has more energy than ever before. With me the kidneys were a big issue so getting levels every three weeks was not fun, but with keto you must drink at least eight glasses of water. I drink 12 glasses of water a day. We will definitely stay on keto and watch macros. We use 5% carbs, 70% fat and 20% protein.
Mai Funaki. Thank you for your comment. You do touch on some interesting points concerning low carb, overweight, obesity and diabetes. It has certainly been suggested that carbohydrate restriction may be beneficial in type 2 diabetes. Here is an interesting overview that you might want to read: https://www.nutritionandmetabolism.com/content/5/1/9. I do agree with you about physical activity. I think it is an essential part of a healthy lifestyle and a key to physical and psychological wellbeing. The japanese experience is certainly interesting and proves that carbohydrates don´t necessarily make you fat. This may all depend on the type and amount of… Read more »
Years ago I was on Atkins diet for 6 months. I lost weight but then I got acute kidney failure. Had to be hospitalised with iv therapy and careful blood monitoring. My bun ( blood urea nitrogen) and creatinine was abnormally high. An indicator of kidney function. I was taken off the Atkins diet. Since then my BUN has been high showing a permanent effect on kidney function. I was worried that the keto or low carb diet could put me in jeopardy. What do you think about appropriateness of the diets for me?. Now I am Pre diabetic and obese. I was not ten years ago when on the diet
To provide the body with energy, you will increase the consumption of natural healthy fats. You will eat dairy fat, animal fat and plant-derived fat. You will avoid low-fat dairy products because they are usually rich in artificial sugar. Then slowly, later on, you start selectively adding carbohydrate to your diet, in the amount tolerated so that you will not start to gain weight again.
While little research has been done specifically around the diet's long-term effects, some studies suggest there are health benefits in following such a strict low-carbohydrate diet, such as its ability to improve type 2 diabetes and shrink some forms of brain cancer. However, more research on humans is needed and, as Professor Collins warns, this diet is used in medical nutrition therapy as a short-term test diet for specific medical conditions such as epilepsy and should only be used medically under the supervision of experts.
Last month, I was diagnosed pre-diabetic. I was only .3 from being classified as diabetic. My doctor told me to eat low carb and low sugar. Hopefully by losing 20 – 30 lbs, I won’t have to take medication. I have been researching the internet for information on a Low Carb diet and your website has been the most helpful to me. I have been doing the best I can with the low carb diet with what little I know. I haven’t lost much weight (6 lbs), but I do feel much better. I am proud that I have not had a Dr Pepper in 4 1/2 weeks! I have an appointment to see a nutritionist on Wednesday so I am hoping to get more info. Thank you for sharing your knowledge!
Thank you for writing this post, it’s very helpful! I started low carbing a while back (probably more than a year ago) and ended up backsliding, as can often happen when trying to drastically change your eating habits. On Friday I had my annual physical and my doctor ordered blood work for glucose and insulin because previous results indicate I’m insulin resistant. The results from Friday indicate I still am, so now I’m a little worried and going back to low carb. One phone app (and website) I’ve found to be really helpful is Fat Secret. You can choose exactly which macro nutrients you want to see and it also shows percent of fat, carbs, and protein in a pie chart that I find helps me wrap my head around what I’ve consumed. It also helps that the app and website don’t seem to promote one eating plan over another.
“Now fast forward to the present. The United States is currently re-assessing a 3-decade, uncontrolled experiment in which carbohydrates were lauded and fats demonized. Concurrently we have become one of the most obese countries in the world. And across the globe, tragically, indigenous peoples with historically low carbohydrate intakes now have extremely high prevalence rates of obesity and type-2 diabetes (e.g., the Gulf States in the Middle East, Pacific Islanders, First Nations in Canada, and Australian Aborigines).”
I’m 68 yrs. old & was diagnosed as diabetic 6 mos. ago with an A1C of 6.8. My Dr. prescribed Metformin for me, but after seeing the side effects it could cause, I decided to not take it & try Low carbing instead. In 6 weeks, I lost 16 lbs. and lowered my A1C to 6.4. That was enough to convince my Dr. that I could forego the medicine and stick with my diet. 4 mos. later, I’d lost another 14 lbs. and my A1C was down to 5.9! My cholesterol ratio is in the middle of the recommended range, and my triglycerides (I have Fibromyalgia which is said to raise triglycerides) have dropped 100 pts. I’ve lost another 5 lbs. in the last 2 weeks. My Dr. And I are both thrilled, so I highly recommend a Low Carb diet for controlling your glucose level and cholesterol.
Hi Megan, Sorry about that – there was an issue with that section and you should now see it in the FAQ above, explaining how it’s determined. The weight loss per week will depend on how much weight you have to lose, as weight loss happens more rapidly the more overweight you are. But in general, between 0.5 and 2 pounds loss per week is reasonable.
Although amino acids from protein foods can be converted to glucose, under experimental conditions, only a small percentage actually are. This may be related to individual factors, such as degree of insulin resistance. However, even people with type 2 diabetes usually do well with the adequate levels of protein Diet Doctor recommends, if their diets are also low carb.
The aim of ketogenic diets is to send the body into a state of ‘ketosis’ by using a very strict low-carb diet. This umbrella term can include diets such as the Atkins diet, Dukan diet and LCHF (low carb, high fat) diets such as the banting diet, although the ratios of fat, protein and carbs and other specific features of each diet (e.g. ‘phases’) can vary.
There is much evidence suggesting that people with the metabolic syndrome suffer from carbohydrate intolerance, a phenomenon that is associated with high levels of insulin and insulin resistance. This implies an exaggerated glucose and insulin response to a given amount of carbohydrate ingested. Glucose uptake by muscles may be impaired which may help divert ingested carbohydrate to the liver where it is converted to fat. This may lead to elevated triglycerides and other lipid problems.
After imagining I'd have a Biggest Loser-type reveal, after two weeks on the diet, I was disappointed to find I'd only lost 1.5kg. But I was pleasantly surprised by the lack of hunger I experienced. For example, if I started the day with bacon and eggs, I wouldn't get hungry again till the afternoon, whereas my typical instant oats breakfast leaves me ravenous by 11am.
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