Insulin is a hormone that lets your body use or store sugar as fuel. Ketogenic diets make you burn through this fuel quickly, so you don’t need to store it. This means your body needs -- and makes -- less insulin. Those lower levels may help protect you against some kinds of cancer or even slow the growth of cancer cells. More research is needed on this, though.

When your body burns its stores of fat, it can be hard on your kidneys. And starting a ketogenic diet -- or going back to a normal diet afterward -- can be tricky if you’re obese because of other health issues you’re likely to have, like diabetes, a heart condition, or high blood pressure. If you have any of these conditions, make diet changes slowly and only with the guidance of your doctor.
As the year comes to an end and the holiday indulgences just keep on coming (d*mn you, office cookie parties!), you may already be considering a weight-loss plan to try out for the New Year. One that's been around for years and likely isn't going anywhere? Cutting carbs. And then there's keto, the über-popular, high-fat extension of that. But if you're considering slashing those delicious carbohydrates at all, you might be wondering: What exactly makes keto different from low-carb diets in general? And really, who would win in a low-carb vs. keto face-off?
I tend to follow a Keto eating plan and I have seen many benefits from doing so. Often people ask me how I can possibly be healthy eating that much fat. But when fat becomes your main fuel source, your whole body functions differently. Traditional nutrition “rules” no longer apply in that respect. I have seen all my lab work come back into normal ranges within a matter of months. So if you feel you may benefit from a Keto plan, it could definitely be worth, at the very least, a try.
When you’re following a traditional ketogenic diet, you consume around 75 percent of your daily calories from healthy fats, 5 percent from carbohydrates and approximately 20 percent from protein. In general, ketogenic diets typically limit daily net carb intake to just 20–30 grams, which is calculated by subtracting the number of grams of fiber from the total number of carbs.
Allow me to affirm the benefits of LCHF DIETS as described in the article, with some suggestion and additions to it. Fats do clog arteries by the means of increasing the blood plasma aggregability, in other words it doesn’t increase the viscosity of blood but obstructs its rate of entrance within capillary vessels. But this is OK. not a problem, if it is continued for a reasonable period. However it is a big damaging clogging element, if the blood vessels are not giving sometime to heal. On the otherhand excessive carbs intake will finally be converted to visceral stored fat, and again this is absolutely OK, as long as this doesn’t continue fo ever, brcause it will start clogging body organs, like the liver, the pancreas, and the heart. However, if at a certain juncture, excessive carbs intake is disrupted, and a person alternates between LCHF & LFHC diets, this should periodically takes full advantage of each diet, and still give ample time to heal from its disadvantages… think about that. Nature usually forced all living beings to alternate between different categories of food depending on each season. And as a matter of fact, this is what body builders do. It’s called cyclic carbing….
You can read my response to Melanie (from Feb 7). I, too, have experienced stalls in my weight loss. Like I said, I lost 16 lbs. the first 6 weeks, then only 14 lbs. in 2 mos., then nothing for over 2 mos. I just stuck with the regimen, then over 2 days I lost 5 lbs. The weight seems to come off in fits & starts rather than an even, steady pace. I’d like to lose another 35 lbs, so I would love to read your thoughts on how to best achieve my goal if you decide to write a blog as you indicated above!
Hi Michelle, You don’t necessarily have to “hit” macros to get into ketosis. Ketosis is achieved by restricting carbohydrates, that’s it. Fat is needed for satiety and protein is needed to prevent muscle loss. So make protein a goal and carbs a limit, then eat enough fat to stay satisfied and don’t go over your macros. You can get more individual help in our support group.
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