Hi Sandy, I’m not a doctor so cannot give medical advice, but do have years of research and experience in this lifestyle. Kidney failure can happen due to excessive protein intake, which was more prevalent on older versions of the Atkins diet. This is a common misconception with low carb and keto diets – that they have to mean high protein – and they shouldn’t be. If you keep your protein in check, it shouldn’t be an issue. But, I would definitely consult with your doctor since you have had issues with this.


Similar to the gut microbiome, skin maintains its own bacterial balance. One type of bacteria known as P. Acnes lives deep within the hair follicles and is normally present in the outer skin layer in small amounts. However, during acne, concentrations of P. Acnes increase dramatically, causing inflammation that leads to whiteheads, pustules and cysts.

After doing a lot of research, my wife and I have decided to practice a low carb diet instead of keto. Keto is too restrictive, and excludes too many food items that are are essential to long term health. I’m in good shape, she can lose 20-30 lbs. With a low carb diet and exercise, she’s already lost 6lbs in the first two weeks. I think keto may be good for people who need to lose 40 lbs fast. It’s not necessary for people who are in relative good health and know how to lose weight by conventional methods – low carb, HIIT workouts, slight caloric deficiency. Other than the fast results, I don’t see unique benefits of keto diet.


Look for ways to scale back that don't feel restrictive: eat one piece of toast at breakfast instead of two. If that's manageable, cut back by another 15 grams and ditch half the bun on your burger at lunch. Ideally, you'll want to get about 30-40 percent of your calories from carbs, says Weinandy. Don't overlook total calories, protein, and fat: all are important to maintain a balanced diet.

I eat a diet that varies from ketogenic to simply very low carb, and I love it. After a lifetime of being overweight and unfit, I am now, in middle age, in the best shape of my life. I weigh less and wear a smaller size than I did in my teens. I am also stronger and fitter than ever. In addition, my physician was "keep[ing] an eye on" a number of health issues of the type that most people assume are the inevitable result of ageing: Elevated blood lipids; elevated blood pressure; elevated blood sugar. I attribute a great deal of my success to the fact that I was motivated this time much more by health than vanity. They wanted me to go on statins, and I just refused. I applied myself in earnest to a low-carb way of eating, and in the course of my research I learned about ketogenic diets. I normally eat about 75 grams a day of fat; when I am riding regularly, that's often 100 or more; during long-distance rides, 150+.
While little research has been done specifically around the diet's long-term effects, some studies suggest there are health benefits in following such a strict low-carbohydrate diet, such as its ability to improve type 2 diabetes and shrink some forms of brain cancer. However, more research on humans is needed and, as Professor Collins warns, this diet is used in medical nutrition therapy as a short-term test diet for specific medical conditions such as epilepsy and should only be used medically under the supervision of experts.
Hi. When using the calculator the choices for activity only consider what type of “job” or lifestyle you have. I am back in school, so mostly sedentary but I work out at least 5 days a week eithere circuit training cardio/weights, body pump class, or stairmaster for 45 min to an hour. Does that not count toward anything? Is that still considered sedentary? Thanks!

Low carb eating is a broad term that can be applied to many different approaches and eating plans. It can be based on just about any number of carbs that are less than what you would typically eat. Every low carb diet out there from South Beach to Atkins will give you a different number of carbs to shoot for. So if you want to eat low carb, but are not interested in a Keto diet, you will need to do your research on the many, many low carb diets available on the market today.
The aim of ketogenic diets is to send the body into a state of ‘ketosis’ by using a very strict low-carb diet. This umbrella term can include diets such as the Atkins diet, Dukan diet and LCHF (low carb, high fat) diets such as the banting diet, although the ratios of fat, protein and carbs and other specific features of each diet (e.g. ‘phases’) can vary.

Hi. When using the calculator the choices for activity only consider what type of “job” or lifestyle you have. I am back in school, so mostly sedentary but I work out at least 5 days a week eithere circuit training cardio/weights, body pump class, or stairmaster for 45 min to an hour. Does that not count toward anything? Is that still considered sedentary? Thanks!
I have nothing against low-fat diets. However, I doubt that the emphasis on low-fat, low saturated fat, in particular, is based on good scientific evidence. Furthermore, I believe that the overemphasis on low-fat may have caused consumers and manufacturers to choose foods that may be potentially harmful and could have contributed to the so-called obesity epidemic and increased prevalence of type 2 diabetes.

The main three macros that should be taken into consideration for a healthy body weight or fat loss are Carbohydrates, Proteins and fats. The amount of carbs, protein, fats are the basic macronutrients you should be careful about while keeping in account your body weight. For choosing the best macros, Keto diet is preferred by many individuals who have set on a low carb diet. The three major macros
Under normal circumstances our body uses glucose from carbohydrate foods for energy. In the absence of glucose a process called ketosis occurs. This is a state in which the body burns fats instead of carbohydrates as its main fuel source. When we don’t eat carbs, the liver breaks down fat stores to produce energy. This energy is in the form of (and also creates) molecules called ‘ketones’. 
This is a typical lipid response to a low carb high fat diet. TG going town and HDL going up is clearly positive. Normally a slight elevation of LDL-C is not a cause for concern. I would suggest you check your lipids on 3-6 months. If there is further elevation of LDL-C you might try to reduce the relative contribution of saturated fat in your diet and use other fats instead, olive oil instead of butter etc.
I now eat a lower carb, moderate protein and moderate fat diet. I even eat whole wheat pasta (only 1/3 cup when I do eat it), I eat Ezekiel bread (1 slice) and on occassion, I eat potatoes (white) and even rice. I just keep the amounts around 10 grams of carbs. My breakfast is about 4 grams of carbs (its a protein shake and I put avacado in it as well). Lunch is 4 oz. protein, steamed veggies and/or a salad, slice of my bread with 1/2 tbsp. grass fed butter, snacks are 1.5 oz. nuts (1 oz. macadamian and 1/2 oz. cashews). Dinner has carbs from green veggies. And that’s it. And I drink a protein shake once a day because I lift weights along with doing cardio. In that shake I put 1/2 tbsp. nut butter and mix the shake with water. Sometimes I’ll add 1 to 2 oz. banana (yes, I weigh all of my food). And guess what?? I lose as much weight per week as if I was doing keto. I truly believe that eating a minimal amount of carbs per day makes a huge impact with weight loss. You don’t have to go into full blown keto to lose weight.
If you think you might be interested in following a Ketogenic diet, I implore you to do your research. There are many concerns and issues that can arise based on your own, individual constitution. For those people who can benefit from this sort of eating plan, the benefits are endless. But there are things you need to watch for when following this sort of eating plan. So do your homework. This is not for everyone.
Keto Macros hopes to provide information to anyone still trying to figure this “keto” thing out. There is information throughout the site about the ketogenic diet for all health and fitness goals; weight loss, muscle gain, or body maintenance. Our bodies are all different and there are just as many perspectives of optimal nutritional ketosis to be considered & discussed for your personal health. We respect everyone’s right to finding what works for them.
I’ve been LCHF Ketogenic for 1 year I’m at my natural weight, but had to face the doc today re-chol, fasting glucose 4.8 good, HDL 1.09 good, trig 1.75 ok LDL 8.91 shock horror, total cholesterol 10.8 shock horror. Trying to discuss pattern A and pattern B LDL particles cut no ice! Got to face a surgeon soon, what the hell am I gonna say LOL In the UK LDL is indirect ie Freidewald Equation Drs do not want to discuss LDL-Particles

The benefits of LCHF diets in sports are mainly seen in long-distance running and other endurance events. The body’s fat stores are huge and dwarf the minuscule glycogen stores. This means that once an athlete has transitioned to burning fat instead of carbohydrates, he or she will be able to perform for long periods of time without needing much (if any) additional food for energy.

It is important to remember that people have different needs, and that no single weight-loss diet suits everyone. A ketogenic diet may be an option for some people who have had difficulty losing weight with other methods, but if you choose to go on a ketogenic diet, it’s best to be under the supervision of a doctor and an accredited practising dietitian.


Doubful. There is no “energy loss” on a LC/HF WOE. Rather, energy is increased, is more consistent and more readily available (since the body can much more readily access the massive “calories” stored in fat quickly for energy, something not available to people on “normal” diets who will “hit the wall” when sugar-energy runs out. For more, read this: https://www.meandmydiabetes.com/2011/04/14/steve-phinney-low-carb-preserves-glycogen-better-than-high-carb/. More likely, the real reason is MASSIVE DECREASERES IN REVENUES (profit) to lots of interested parties. Those include processed food makers (nearly all of which are carb-based), pharmaceutical and medical companies and grain-based agricultural concerns. Ever wonder how it is… Read more »
Dr. Sigurdsson, This is a very interesting post that highlights the potential benefits of low carbohydrate, high fat diets (LCHF) for overweight and obese individuals. As someone who is very interested in healthy diet and lifestyle, when I ran into your post I was very much intrigued. I do, indeed, agree with your belief that the standard dietary recommendations do not factor in individualism and does not work for all of us. Like your personal successful experience through this particular diet, I have tried this too in the past and it was very much successful. Given my field of interest… Read more »
I am researching everything I can find and at the same time, have cut as many carbs as I can until I can figure it all out; back-tracking from the decision to do keto. The first few days of doing this, I DID increase the fat, going so far as the bulletproof coffee and using even more butter on my food, etc. Monitoring blood sugar and now, ketone strips, I saw no reduction in blood sugar and no burning of ketones as I kept expecting. It DID seem counterintuitive to ingest fat for my body to burn when I have WAY more fat to burn already stored! So, what I’m thinking (and what do I know?) is this… wouldn’t the stored fat be considered in the “macros” balance until a person achieved a more normal weight, and therefore, eliminate the need for all that extra dietary fat to be added? So, though it appears to be different than what we call a low carb diet, it would essentially e one in the same? IDK…still trying to to figure it all out!
Hi Tiffany! I’m a big fan of the keto diet and have been following it for a while. Out of interest do you practice any carb refeed days? I have found that if I add a small amount of carbs to my evening meal twice a week (not a lot – just for example, 1 piece of fruit or half a sweet potato), I fare a lot better. I think this is because I came from a place where I had a lot of healing to do (adrenal stuff). Interested to know your experience?
This plan has more fat and less protein than the pure carnivore plan, and likely less meat: even fatty meat isn’t all that fatty by keto standards (for example, a nice juicy grilled T-bone is a whopping 38% protein, although you can lower that percentage rapidly by adding butter on top). With keto, you don’t necessarily eat a whole pile of T-bones; it’s more like half a T-bone with a lot of butter and some avocado and spinach salad.
  A week and more into the low carb diet, I bumped into the term called ‘Macros’ and everyone over the internet was talking about macros this and macros that. After a bunch of google search I finally found out that macro was a short form of ‘Macronutrients’ and keeping count of such nutrients is really essential as you tend to indulge in a weight loss plan.
×